Sarah Perdue



An abstract image shows a DNA double helix overlaying a human outline, with cartoon molecules depicting the different genetic and protein changes that may be causing disease
Precision medicine has become a fairly big buzzword in cancer treatment lately. The University of Wisconsin is planning the UW Center for Human Genomics and Precision Medicine, and the Wisconsin state government’s recently-passed budget includes funding for the UW Carbone Cancer Center’s statewide Precision Medicine Molecular Tumor Board. What is […]

What is precision medicine in cancer treatment?




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At the Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters’ James Watrous Gallery, local artist Leslie Iwai’s exhibit, Daughter Cells, is on display now through January 22. Iwai’s work was largely inspired through a collaboration with UW Carbone Cancer Center professor Mark Burkard and his research on cell division. I sat down with Iwai and Burkard recently to […]

When science becomes art


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UW Oncology professor Caroline Alexander had a good problem to tackle: She was studying a strain of mice that are resistant to up to 80 percent of tumors. Naturally, she wanted to learn why. “But none of the resistance mechanisms we were proposing were panning out,” Alexander, a researcher with […]

A big, fat picture of body fats




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From research to diagnosis to treatment, the ability to visualize cancer has played a big role in understanding and fighting the disease. To highlight this importance, and to show how advanced imaging has become, the National Cancer Institute recently held its “Cancer Close Up” contest. Two UW Carbone Cancer Center […]

Cancer gets a close-up


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In any research field, shifting a paradigm is never easy. If you’re going to try, it never hurts to continuously improve your techniques and evolve your models. And, use lasers. Rich Halberg, associate professor of medicine at the UW Carbone Cancer Center, has spent over a decade challenging the tenet […]

Shining a (laser) light on the ancestry of cancers