Q&A



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Perhaps you’ve noticed: It’s spring and the Plants Are Blooming. Maybe it’s the smell of the lilacs, or the buzzing of bees. Or perhaps it’s the lush greens and bursts of color blurring your field of vision. But have you ever wondered how the landscape transitions from the brown drab of […]

Why flowers need winter


Two cyclists on Madison's Capital City Loop, November 2016
This post comes courtesy of Jenny Seifert, science writer and outreach coordinator for the Water Sustainability and Climate Project at UW–Madison. A version of this story first appeared last month on WSC’s blog, Yahara in situ: Staying cool may not be a concern to Madisonians at this time of the year, […]

Biking, for science



Planetary nebula NGC 2818, a gaseous shroud of a dying, sun-like star in the southern constellation Pyxis.
Putting telescopes and astronomical instruments in space has long been a UW-Madison specialty. Since at least the early 1960s, when the late Wisconsin astronomer Arthur D. Code devised a cigar-box sized photometer for the X-15, the first rocket-powered plane to soar briefly in space, UW-Madison has been developing hardware – […]

Hubble and beyond



Marsha Mailick, Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education
Marsha Mailick has been selected Vice Chancellor for Research and Graduate Education at UW-Madison, after filling in as interim vice chancellor since September 1, 2014. The position was created after the Faculty Senate voted to restructure the Graduate School, splitting the university research enterprise into the Graduate School and the Office of the Vice […]

A Q&A with Marsha Mailick




Tundra swan//Photo by Peter Kleppin 1
Two weeks ago, back when it still felt like real winter, I was out for a run along the Lakeshore Path. There was a noticeable film of thin ice creeping from shore and plates of frozen water clanging together in the rolling chop. But that sound was soon drowned out by […]

The return of the tundra swan