cancer



An abstract image shows a DNA double helix overlaying a human outline, with cartoon molecules depicting the different genetic and protein changes that may be causing disease
Precision medicine has become a fairly big buzzword in cancer treatment lately. The University of Wisconsin is planning the UW Center for Human Genomics and Precision Medicine, and the Wisconsin state government’s recently-passed budget includes funding for the UW Carbone Cancer Center’s statewide Precision Medicine Molecular Tumor Board. What is […]

What is precision medicine in cancer treatment?




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UW Oncology professor Caroline Alexander had a good problem to tackle: She was studying a strain of mice that are resistant to up to 80 percent of tumors. Naturally, she wanted to learn why. “But none of the resistance mechanisms we were proposing were panning out,” Alexander, a researcher with […]

A big, fat picture of body fats


Microscopic image
From research to diagnosis to treatment, the ability to visualize cancer has played a big role in understanding and fighting the disease. To highlight this importance, and to show how advanced imaging has become, the National Cancer Institute recently held its “Cancer Close Up” contest. Two UW Carbone Cancer Center […]

Cancer gets a close-up


closeup of human papilloma virus
There may not yet be a cure for cancer, but for some human cancers, one thing comes pretty close: the HPV vaccine. That’s why, last week, the 69 National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers, including UW-Madison’s Carbone Cancer Center (UWCCC), issued a statement urging increased uptake of the three-dose vaccination. This […]

Preventing cancer in just three shots




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Comic explains cancer find linking experimental vaccine, biological treatment A University of Wisconsin-Madison biochemist has linked two seemingly unrelated cancer treatments: A vaccine that targets a structure on the outside of cancer cells, and An altered enzyme that breaks RNA and causes the cell to commit suicide.

Bio-comix to the rescue!


In multiple myeloma, there are too many snipers - or plasma cells - and because they are diseased, they make and shoot too many bullets
Recently, UW-Madison researchers studied tumors from a patient with multiple myeloma to develop a new and promising approach to better understand the genetics of cancer. UW-Madison professor and lead researcher on the study, David C. Schwartz, described it as the “Google Maps” for the cancer genome because it allows scientists to zoom in […]

Multiple myeloma, a cancer of snipers and bullets